ID# 892:
"Radiographic study of physical growth in children," by T. Wingate Todd
Date:
Circa 1920
Pages: (1|2|3|4)
Source:
Rockefeller Archive Center, Ser 3, Box 43, Folder 449, Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Collection
View this image in our new website.
&quote;Radiographic study of physical growth in children,&quote; by T. Wingate Todd

Radiographic study of physical growth in children. T. Wingate Todd, Western Reserve University. We have studied 568 children from five to sixteen years; measured, weighed and tested muscular strength; made radiograms of left hand and wrist, elbow, shoulder, foot ad ankle, knee and hip. Weight may vary three to four pounds a day: dimensions are very constant in relation to standing height: muscular strength is profoundly affected by the interest and the state of health of the child. Average dimensions in samples of fifteen to twenty-five are fairly reliable for the social class from which the children are drawn. Our previous investigations show that (i) there is no relationship between commencement of ossification of an epiphysis and its final union with the shaft (ii) that the human wrist and forearm have undergone considerable modification in differentiation and are not so dependable as other limb epiphyses for estimation of age (iii) the time of commencing "precipitation" of bone in the wrist cartilages is erratic (iv) the terminal stages in ossification and union of epiphyses are most closely time-linked (v) dimensions of epiphyses on radiograms are not comparable with dimensions of the actual epiphyses since bone only, and not cartilage, is shown on the radiogram. Taking the knee as an example we can trace definite age relationships in epiphysial ossification.

Copyright 1999-2004: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; American Philosophical Society; Truman State University; Rockefeller Archive Center/Rockefeller University; University of Albany, State University of New York; National Park Service, Statue of Liberty National Monument; University College, London; International Center of Photography; Archiv zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin-Dahlem; and Special Collections, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
The images and text in this Archive are solely for educational and scholarly uses. The materials may be used in digital or print form in reports, research, and other projects that are not offered for sale. Materials in this archive may not be used in digital or print form by organizations or commercial concerns, except with express permission.